Beneath the Cross of Jesus

6-11-19

-Drew Bundy

Introduction

“Beneath the Cross of Jesus” by Keith and Kristyn Getty leads its singers to marvel at God’s great love, grace, and mercy that would go to the lengths of the cross for unworthy sinners. Through the three verses of this song the Gettys bring their singers to the foot of the cross to wonder at the gift of salvation, find unity with the family of God, and dedicate themselves to follow in Christ’s path.

The Gospel

As the titular line indicates, this song is cross-centered and is faithful to that thought by expounding on some of the particulars of the gospel message. The first verse has a particularly beautiful line about the glory of the gospel: “For hands that should discard me/ Hold wounds which tell me, ‘Come.’” This recognition of our unworthiness to receive such mercy is one of the best things about this telling of the gospel.

Names of God

There are only two names used for God in this song. Jesus is repeated twice in each verse and serves to frequently focus the singer on Him and His saving work. The other name used is simply God. Though there aren’t a lot of names here, these along with the content of each verse make it plain who is being sung about.

Heavenward Focus

As gospel-centered as this song is, it doesn’t fail to be heavenward as well. There is arguably more heavenward language than even gospel language. The last verse particularly sets the singer’s mind on following Christ at great cost and for an eternal reward. This song does well at balancing thoughts about salvation in how it relates to us and thoughts about eternity and dedication to Christ.

Theological vs. Doxological

This song presents great truths but in such a way that they cause the singer to wonder, marvel, devote themselves, and rejoice. Each of these elements respond to important truths clearly stated making this song both Theological and Doxological.

Why did it get this score?

“Beneath the Cross of Jesus” by Keith and Kristyn Getty received a 92% from the “Is it Helpful? Chart.” This high score is owing to the Getty’s ability to write something that expounds on the gospel as well as give the singers opportunities to praise God, and specifically Jesus, with wonder and submission. 

Utilizing it in a Service

I find that this song is a good one to close a portion of the service with. It slows the congregation down and gives them opportunity to somberly reflect on their place at the foot of the cross. The last verse can be especially good at ending the whole service as it sends singers out ready to follow Jesus.


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See how this song compares to others in our Reviewed Songs.

Drew Bundy